CDFA News
CDFA Announces $13 Million of Community Development Block Grant Awards in New Hampshire Communities
2019-01-17

The New Hampshire Community Development Finance Authority (CDFA) announced it has awarded more than $13 million of Community Development Block Grant funds in communities throughout New Hampshire in 2017 and 2018. These critical resources support housing, public facility and economic development projects in communities throughout the state. 

Funding for the Community Development Block Grant program is provided to New Hampshire through the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. The following projects have been awarded Community Development Block Grant funds in 2017 and 2018. 

Housing and Public Facilities

The Housing and Public Facilities Program awards funds to support community development projects that primarily benefit low- and moderate-income persons or households.

  • The City of Berlin was awarded $500,000 on behalf of Berlin Housing Authority to complete renovations of the St. Regis Academy building in downtown Berlin. The building consists of 42 units of housing with 41 of those units set aside for low- and moderate-income households. Due to the historic nature of the building, as well as certain structural deficiencies, St. Regis is in desperate need of substantial rehabilitation.
  • The Town of Ashland was awarded $500,000 on behalf of Lakes Region Community Developers to complete renovations at Harvey Heights, an affordable housing development. The 40-unit housing development includes both two-bedroom and one-bedroom units. CDBG funds will support critical renovations including life safety systems, handicap accessibility, energy efficiency measures and other necessary upgrades. Thirty-nine of the 40 units will be permanently affordable. 
  • Cheshire County was awarded $500,000 on behalf of Keene Housing to complete renovations at Central Square Terrace in downtown Keene. The 90-unit property is designed as residential housing for elderly and disabled persons. Capital improvements are necessary to maintain its compliance with Section 8 Housing Quality Standards. One-hundred percent of the units are for low- and moderate-income residents.  
  • The City of Lebanon was awarded $500,000 on behalf of the Twin Pines Housing Trust for the costs associated with temporary relocation of residents while the units at the Village at Craft Hills are being renovated. The Village of Craft Hills is a 40-year-old housing development with 100 units in West Lebanon. One-hundred percent of households are low- to moderate-income.
  • The City of Laconia was awarded $150,000 on behalf of the Lakes Region Community Developers to acquire a site in Laconia which would house its offices and a community space for their clients. The building would become the Court Street Neighborhood Center and the organization is anticipating to serve approximately 300 individuals annually, of which 228, or 76 percent, qualify as low- and moderate-income persons.
  • The Town of Boscawen was awarded $500,000 on behalf of the Woody Hollow Cooperative (WHC) to complete water system improvements. Woody Hollow is a 30-unit manufactured home cooperative. Eighty-three percent of the households are low- to moderate-income with 63 percent of the households considered low- or very low-income.
  • The City of Laconia was awarded $350,000 on behalf of Navigating Recovery of the Lakes Region to purchase a property in the downtown Laconia area to relocate and expand the services they provide. The organization is a peer-to-peer recovery center providing services since November 2016 to residents from Laconia and the Greater Lakes Region suffering from Substance Use Disorder. The Lakes Region is an area with a significant need for a Recovery Community Organization. A 2017 community needs assessment, completed by Lakes Region General Healthcare, identified alcohol and other drug use prevention, treatment, and recovery as the number one community health issue.
  • The City of Concord was awarded $500,000 for demolition and site work in order to prepare a former brownfields site for the construction of affordable housing. The City plans on selling the site to the Caleb Penacook Ltd Partnership. The Partnership is proposing to construct 34 units of housing, of which 31, or 91 percent, will be occupied by low- and moderate-income households.
  • The Town of Belmont was awarded $304,000 on behalf of the Westview Meadows Homeowners Association for water system improvements. Westview Meadows Association consists of 24 households of which 58 percent are considered low- and moderate-income. 
  • The Town of Newmarket was awarded $500,000 in CDBG funds on behalf of the Newmarket Housing Authority to make improvements to 50 units of family housing, 48 of which are occupied by people from low- to moderate-income households. The funds will be used to make critical water and sewer infrastructure improvements, handicap accessible walkways to all residential units, as well as a variety of interior updates.
  • The Town of Newport was awarded $500,000 on behalf of the Newport Senior Center to expand and renovate the existing facility. The Senior Center provides services to 600 seniors annually of whom at least 93 percent are from low- and moderate-income households. The proposed renovations will address the critical need for space for both immediate and future needs. 
  • The City of Keene was awarded $500,000 in CDBG funds for critical building and equipment improvements at The Community Kitchen. The Community Kitchen provides healthy and nutritious hot meals, take-home food boxes, as well as advocacy to low- and moderate-income individuals and families in the Monadnock Region. 
  • The City of Concord was awarded $500,000 on behalf of the Concord YMCA to undertake extensive interior and exterior renovations critical to its operation, including replacing the furnace, nonworking elevator and other improvements to their childcare facility. The Concord YMCA provides childcare services in its Firehouse building to 135 children, of whom at least 66 percent are from low- and moderate-income households. The YMCA must complete the improvement project or the facility may close and the families of the 135 children would need to find another affordable childcare facility. There are very limited affordable, high-quality choices in the area. 
  • The Town of Charlestown was awarded $499,460 in CDBG funds on behalf of the Crown Point Cooperative to replace its existing individual septic systems with a single distribution system which will connect to the municipal wastewater system. In addition, the project will replace existing substandard electrical infrastructure. The 15-unit manufactured home community is made up of 100 percent low- and moderate-income households.
  • The Town of Derry received a grant of $499,840 on behalf of Frost Residents Cooperative to replace existing septic systems by connecting to the municipal wastewater system and demolish an unsafe building. The Department of Environmental Services considers the issues with the septic system and its potential to contaminate the water supply and distribution system to be a significant deficiency which poses a risk to public health. The co-op has 30 households of which 83 percent are low- and moderate-income.
  • The Town of Exeter was awarded $500,000 on behalf of Avesta Housing to assist in the development of 43 units of family housing, 38 of which will be affordable. This project is the forth phase of a larger development that results in a four building, 122-unit development in which 88 percent of the units will be occupied by low-income households.
  • Belknap County was awarded $455,000 in CDBG funds on behalf of the Granite State Children’s Alliance to renovate a 4000 square foot building in Laconia to centralize services for the Greater Lakes Child Advocacy Center (CAC) and develop a Model Child Advocacy Center. The newly renovated facility will allow CAC to offer centrally located, coordinated services for children and families all in one location. Having these services under one roof streamlines a very complicated support system, putting the child and family in the best position to be successful in recovery. The CAC supports child victims of physical and sexual abuse, as well children who have witnessed violent crimes with 76 percent of those served being of low- and moderate-income.
  • The City of Franklin was awarded $500,000 on behalf of Community Action Program of Belknap-Merrimack Counties, Inc. for the demolition of the existing building and construction of a new facility at 82 Elkins Street in Franklin. The downtown facility is a hub of critical services for low- and moderate-income residents in Franklin and the six surrounding communities. Services provided are in the areas of child development, health and nutrition, energy assistance, job development, housing, and more. The project will serve 2,452 beneficiaries in total, with 76 percent of the beneficiaries being of low-to-moderate income.
  • The City of Claremont was awarded $500,000 to support the building rehab and expansion of the Sullivan County Oral Health Collaborative. The improvements will allow the clinic to add treatment space and launch a new innovative dental lab program, as well as contribute to the restoration of a historic building in downtown Claremont. The expansion will allow the organization to provide dental services to an increased number of low- and moderate-income adults and children in Sullivan County.
  • The City of Lebanon was awarded $400,000 on behalf of Twin Pines Housing Trust to develop affordable housing on Tracy Street in downtown Lebanon with easy access to public transportation, employment opportunities and community facilities. The project will create a three story, net zero development with 29 housing units, 100 percent of which will be available to low- and moderate-income residents.
  • Sullivan County was awarded $500,000 on behalf of New England Family Housing to rehabilitate the Goddard Block in Claremont. The multi-use building rehabilitation will contribute to downtown redevelopment efforts by providing commercial space and 36 units of rental housing with 22 of those units reserved for low-to-moderate income tenants.

Economic Development

The Economic Development Program awards funds to support the creation or retention of jobs for low- and moderate-income residents that provide good wages, benefits and training programs. 

  • The Town of Bethlehem was awarded $500,000 in CDBG funds on behalf of Friendship House to assist in the construction of a new residential 32-bed drug and alcohol treatment facility in Bethlehem. The project will retain 23 quality jobs and create two full-time equivalent positions to support the opening of the new facility. Founded in 1981, the Friendship House provides drug and alcohol treatment services including recovery support services, outpatient services and residential treatment. It is the only facility of its kind within a 65-mile radius with a minimum of 76 percent of those individuals served by the organization being from low- and moderate-income households.  
  • The Town of Salem was awarded $500,000 on behalf of the Regional Economic Development Center of Southern New Hampshire (REDC) in order to provide a loan to Salem Ford. The business will use the funds to build a new facility, enabling the creation of 25 jobs, of which sixteen will be held by and/or made available to individuals of low- and moderate-income.
  • The Town of Stratham was awarded $500,000 on behalf of the Regional Economic Development Center of Southern New Hampshire (REDC) in order to setup a revolving loan fund for small businesses. The revolving loan fund program will create at least thirty new, quality jobs. Twenty-seven of those jobs will be made available to persons of low- to moderate-income and require only a high school diploma or equivalent.
  • The City of Keene was awarded $500,000 on behalf of the Monadnock Economic Development Corporation to support the Monadnock Food Co-op expansion project. The business expansion will create up to 25 new, quality jobs of which at least sixteen will be held by or made available to persons of low- to moderate-income and require only a high school diploma or equivalent.
  • The City of Keene was awarded $200,000 on behalf of the Monadnock Economic Development Corporation to support the purchase of equipment by local business 603 OPTX, Inc. The project will result in the creation of 10 new full-time jobs of which at least seven will be held by or made available to persons of low- to moderate-income and require only a high school diploma or equivalent.

Microenterprise Program

The Microenterprise Program helps foster economic development by supporting organizations that provide a full range of entrepreneurial training and technical assistance services to low- and moderate-income micro-business owners and start-ups (those with fewer than five employees). CDFA awarded Microenterprise Program funding to Grafton and Cheshire County which was divided among economic development centers from every corner of the state.  

In 2017, the $749,365 in Microenterprise awards collectively served approximately 274 businesses in New Hampshire. A grant in the amount of $332,000 was made to Grafton County on behalf of these organizations:

  • $96,500 to the Grafton Regional Development Corporation in Plymouth. Some of the services GRDC will provide to approximately 35 participants include lending advice, one-on-one counseling, and seminars geared toward small business development.
  • $134,000 to the Women’s Rural Entrepreneurial Network in Bethlehem. Technical assistance from WREN includes initiatives such as vendor readiness classes, business coaching, and computer tutorials to approximately 50 low-to-moderate income business owners.
  • $101,500 for the Northern Community Investment Corporation in Lancaster. Approximately 50 start-up businesses will be able to take advantage of NCIC’s financial management coaching, marketing seminars, and training in customer service, among other benefits.


Additionally, a grant was made to Cheshire County in the amount of $417,365 on behalf of these organizations:

  • $149,955 to the Hannah Grimes Center in Keene. The center will provide access for 55 microenterprises to its industry cluster program, consultant’s round table, and leadership circles, as well as other services.
  • $137,455 for the Regional Economic Development Center in Raymond. Activities funded include one-on-one meetings with business advisors, training in reading financial statements, and assistance with brand development and marketing. An estimated 50 low-to-moderate income small business owners will use their many resources.
  • $129,955 to the NH Small Business Development Center’s Pathways to Work initiatives in Durham and Manchester. Some of the services they’ll provide to approximately 47 participants include classes on how to start a small business, e-courses on finance, and workshops on topics like marketing and accounting.


In 2018, a grant in the amount of $314,500 was made to Grafton County on behalf of these organizations:

  • $109,000 to the Grafton Regional Development Corporation in Plymouth. Some of the services GRDC will provide to approximately 40 participants include lending advice, one-on-one counseling, and seminars geared toward small business development.
  • $134,000 to the Women’s Rural Entrepreneurial Network in Bethlehem. Technical assistance from WREN includes initiatives such as vendor readiness classes, business coaching, and computer tutorials to approximately 50 low-to-moderate income business owners.
  • $71,500 for the Northern Community Investment Corporation in Lancaster. Approximately 25 start-up businesses will be able to take advantage of NCIC’s financial management coaching, marketing seminars, and training in customer service, among other benefits.


Additionally, a grant was made to Cheshire County in the amount of $417,365 on behalf of these organizations:

  • $149,955 to the Hannah Grimes Center in Keene. The center will provide access for 55 microenterprises to its industry cluster program, consultant’s round table, and leadership circles, as well as other services.
  • $137,455 for the Regional Economic Development Center in Raymond. Activities funded include one-on-one meetings with business advisors, training in reading financial statements, and assistance with brand development and marketing. An estimated 50 low-to-moderate income small business owners will use their many resources.
  • $129,955 to the NH Small Business Development Center’s Pathways to Work initiatives in Durham and Manchester. Some of the services provided to approximately 47 participants include classes on how to start a small business, e-courses on finance, and workshops on topics like marketing and accounting.


Lastly, Grafton County was awarded $300,000 on behalf of New Hampshire’s ten Regional Development Corporations (RDCs) across the state. These resources are designed to provide capital to the nonprofits which have the primary goal to foster and encourage economic development. The funds are focused on assisting these organizations to fulfill their missions and provide technical assistance to New Hampshire businesses.

Feasibility

The Feasibility Program funds planning and feasibility related activities to determine whether or not a proposed project is viable. 

  • The City of Berlin was awarded $12,000 in CDBG funds to complete a feasibility study for heated streets and sidewalks as part of a planned construction project. The study is intended to help the City determine whether snowmelt infrastructure is practically and financially feasible for the downtown area of Berlin.
  • The City of Berlin was awarded $12,000 to hire a consultant to review the feasibility of the installation of an elevator system in City Hall or to replace their current chairlift system with a modern chairlift system. The desired outcome is to increase accessibility of the building for the citizens of Berlin.
  • The City of Berlin was awarded $12,000 on behalf of Affordable Housing Education & Development (AHEAD) to determine the feasibility of repurposing 121 Main Street, Berlin into a possible health and wellness center. The center would provide space for the development of a new model of healthcare delivery that emphasizes the prevention and self-management of chronic disease, as well as the integration of primary care, oral health and alternative healing therapies.  
  • Grafton County was awarded $12,000 on behalf of Cottage Hospital to conduct a study to identify the need and practicality of the development of an offsite or mobile facility. The study will identify gaps in healthcare coverage within their primary service area which spans seven towns. The proposed mobile or offsite facility will provide services to known and to-be-identified clusters of low- and moderate-income individuals in the Lisbon community and beyond. 
  • Sullivan County was awarded $12,000 to hire a consultant to identify the specific needs of partners and develop a financial and operational model for a sober transitional housing facility. This study will identify an appropriate facility which will help host programs to meet the short-term sober housing and support needs of formerly incarcerated individuals. 
  • The Town of Derry was awarded $12,000 to hire a consultant to determine preliminary design and property development costs for a mixed-use facility that would house a job training center. The study will help determine the maximum development capacity of one of four parcels of town owned land to construct the facility. The facility would expand job training opportunities to help meet the demands of both employers and the available under-skilled labor market while contributing to downtown development.
  • The Town of Ashland was awarded $12,000 to determine the structural integrity of an abandoned building, estimate hazardous materials clean-up costs and potential clean-up funding, and estimate costs to rehabilitate the building. 
  • The City of Claremont was awarded $12,000 on behalf of Claremont Learning Partnership (CLP) to engage an independent consultant to fully assess the condition of the building located at 169 Main Street. The study will help the Claremont Learning Partnership determine whether the building is suitable for long-term use anticipated by the organization and its partners. 
  • Town of Wolfeboro was awarded $12,000 on behalf of Global Awareness Local Action to engage a consultant to develop a preliminary site plan for a Maker Space and Incubator property at 23 Bay Street, Wolfeboro.

To learn more about CDFA, its impact on New Hampshire communities, and available funding resources, visit www.nhcdfa.org. 


About the Community Development Finance Authority 

The Community Development Finance Authority (CDFA) is a statewide nonprofit public authority focused on maximizing the value and impact of community development, economic development and clean energy initiatives throughout New Hampshire. The organization leverages a variety of financial and technical resources, including the competitive deployment of grant, loan and equity programs. Those resources include New Hampshire state tax credits, federal Community Development Block Grant resources and the CDFA Clean Energy Fund. For more information about CDFA and its programs visit www.nhcdfa.org or call 603-226-2170.

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